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Chris LeDoux
"Dallas Days and Fort Worth Nights"
New Country Magazine - Vol 2 Num 4 - 1995

LeDoux - Dallas DaysThe dictionary oughta have Chris LeDoux's picture next to the word "persistence." After an injury-filled season in 1975 had most rodeo veterans counting his chances as between slim and none, LeDoux won the bareback bronc riding World Championship in 1976.

By that time, LeDoux already had another career underway, doing his part to put the Western back in country and Western again

He had started playing guitar and singing about the same time he started riding in rodeos. As he wrote songs, many of them about the life of the Western cowboys and the rodeo riders that populated his world. LeDoux soon became a popular performer at informal gatherings on the rodeo circuit.

A second career was born. LeDoux recorded his first album in 1972. He sold his records out of the back of his truck, helping to support his wife and kids between rodeo wins. His parents also formed a mail-order business, American Cowboy Songs Inc., and LeDoux's albums sold steadily, spreading songs like "Hooked on an Eight Second Ride" and "Cowboy Songs."

He recorded 22 albums and sold more than $4 million worth of records before signing with a major label. In 1989, the then-unknown Garth Brooks said the phrase "a worn out tape of Chris LeDoux" in the lyrics to "Much Too Young (To Feel This Damn Old)." and, after nearly two decades of recording and performing, LeDoux signed to Liberty Records.

The label not only released new LeDoux music, including the gold record Whatcha Gonna Do With a Cowboy, but also began reissuing some of his independent-label records, spreading LeDoux's songs to a much wider audience.

"Dallas Days and Fort Worth Nights" is the latest single from Haywire, which also includes "Honky Tonk World," a cover of Bruce Springsteen's "Tougher Than the Rest" and LeDoux's remake of his own Western swing tune "Sons of the Pioneers."